Old Rudgwick, the Village

Church Street, Rudgwick

Church Street used to be known simply as Rudgwick Street, or just The Street. Old Rudgwick was at the top end of the street, almost exclusively on the west side, and is now a Conservation Area.

Holy Trinity Church is a Grade I Listed building. The tower dates from the 13th century. It is located on the ridge, and is right on the old parish boundary.

The oldest image of Holy Trinity church, before 1844, used here on a greetings card in 1958. the building in front was a barn, long since demolished, on the other side of theroad
The oldest image of Holy Trinity church, before 1844, used here on a greetings card in 1958. the building in front was a barn, long since demolished, on the other side of the road
Rudgwick Church, a framed drawing to be found inside the church, probably the oldest image in existence of this 13th C Grade I listed building
Rudgwick Church, a framed drawing to be found inside the church, probably the second oldest image in existence of this 13th C Grade I listed building
The earliest photograph of the church taken c1900-1905. the tower is the oldest part of the structure.
The earliest photograph of the church taken c1900-1905. the tower is the oldest part of the structure. The west porch was removed in 1912
Holy Trinity church from the north side of the churchyard,  c1905, with its Horsham stone roof
Holy Trinity church from the north side of the churchyard, c1905, with its Horsham stone roof
Curch tower viewed from the path, an iconic view, c1910
Church tower viewed from the path, an iconic view, c1910
Interior of church at Easter; has original 'tortoise' stove as only heating, replaced before 1st World War
Interior of church at Easter; has original ‘tortoise’ stove as only heating, replaced before 1st World War
Another Edwardian view, without the later war memorial on south wall
Another Edwardian view, without the later war memorial on south wall
1905, viewed from the churchyard, where most of these graves have been removed, the backs of the King's Head & Post Office Stores show a typical Rudgwick jumble of style and ages
1905, viewed from the churchyard, where most of these graves have been removed. The back of the King’s Head & Post Office Stores show a typical Rudgwick jumble of style and ages
The Post Office and Stores was next to the churchyard on the ridge top for many years. it is now a private house and (right) church office. older residents remember it as Humphries Stores
c1924, the Post Office and Stores was next to the churchyard on the ridge top for many years. It is now a private house and (right) church office. Older residents remember it as Humphrey’s Stores (before  1915 Cowdery’s). Names: door Moses Humphrey & dau Brenda; steps Thomas John Port; left Harold & Ginny Bailey; postmen Ted Ireland, & Mr Stenning; baker’s cart Fred Dewdney
The King's Head is nowhere near as old as adverts claim! John Jenkins is believed to have built it in the late C18th. His initials are in the brickwork. The lower level was used as a store for the Trinity Fair
The King’s Head, before 1912, is nowhere near as old as adverts claim! Richard Jenkins is believed to have built it perhaps in c1733. Descendent John’s initials are in the brickwork of extension 1826. The lower level was used as a store for the Trinity Fair
The vehicles date this to c1950. the van is visiting the chirch - stained glass specialists from Hove
The vehicles date this to c1950. the van is visiting the church – stained glass specialists Cox & Barnard Ltd of Hove

Church Hill dates from the late 1890s, and was a purpose-built doctor's house for Dr Frank Boxall. it remained a doctor's house and sugery until the 1960s

in 1905,
Photo 1905, Church Hill was built as a purpose- built doctor’s house for Dr Frank Boxall in 1896. It remained a doctor’s house and surgery until the 1960s, and is little altered
a view down from Church Hill to Eames House and Southdown House in 1913. Eames was the home of the village butcher's, with the shop, slaughter house etc next door at Southdown. eames is a C16 Hall House
A view down Church Hill to Eames House and Southdown House in 1913. Eames was the home of the village butcher, with the shop, slaughter house & stables next door at Southdown (a separate house from 1940s). Eames is a C16th hall house
The Jubilee Hall next to Eames House (hall house 1520) was Rudgwick's first school room built 1863 by James Braby of Maybanks, Cox Green, and subsequently given to the parish on Victoria's Jubilee in 1897. it is still in use.
The Jubilee Hall next to Eames House (hall house 1520s) was Rudgwick’s first school room built 1863 by James Braby of Maybanks, Cox Green, and subsequently given to the parish on Victoria’s Jubilee in 1897. Still in use, the railings were removed in the war
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The church and Old Parsonage from the street, with baker’s cart. A view now much altered by modern houses. Parsonage Farm was glebe land, associated with the lay rector, the land of which was on the east side, where no other houses existed until C20th building (see below)
Kings was substantially remodelled in late Georgian times by the Churchman family, was a private school, and is now a handsome house. but its main claim to fame is as a TB sanatorium, when a purpose-built home for patients was erected behind by Dr Annie McCall
Kings was substantially remodelled c1812 by the Ann Churchman, was a private school, and is now a handsome house, but its main claim to fame is as a TB sanatorium, when a purpose-built home for patients was erected behind by Dr Annie McCall
The Sanatorium itself, now two elegant houses, was photogrtaphed by Rudgwick-born photographer WJ Waller, whose studio was in Horsham. the open windows and the breezy huts are typical of TB treatment in the early C20th
The Sanatorium itself, now two elegant houses, was photographed by Rudgwick- born photographer WJ Waller, whose studio was in Horsham. The open windows and the breezy huts are typical of TB treatment in the early C20th. Dr Annie McCall was also noted for her work in midwifery in Clapham
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Rudgwick’s old cottages typify the Conservation Area: Lavender Cottage, Hencocks and Little Ames. Hencocks is all one house today. Little Ames was ‘Grinstead’s’ draper’s shop
Plough Cottage, part of which was once the Plough Inn, formerly three dwellings
Plough Cottage, part of which was once the Plough Inn, formerly three dwellings
Two Wells, left, and Fleming's Stores, both close to the street, built on former waste, the former once called Ivy Cottages, dates from c1400
Two Wells, left, and Fleming’s Stores, both close to the street, built on former roadside waste, the former, once called Ivy Cottages, dates from c1400. the shop had owners: Edmunds, Marden, Fleming & Laudet
In the C20th, the east side of Chrch Street was developed with houses built on former glebeland. the largest was Windacres, seen here from the air, with Church Street and the church in the background, in 1957
In the C20th, the east side of Church Street was developed with houses built on former glebeland. The largest was Windacres, seen here from the air, with Church Street and the church in the background, in 1957
After the arrival of the railway in 1865, the centre of the village was destined to move south. The Martlet Inn (left) opened in 1865. The Edwardian villas (right) are still an attractive backdrop to modern shops which now occupy the other side of the street.
After the arrival of the railway in 1865, the centre of the village was destined to move south. The Martlet Inn (left) opened in 1865. The Edwardian villas (right) are still an attractive backdrop to modern shops which now occupy the other side of the street.
entitles Station Approach, now Martlet Corner, this view of the old Martlet Hotel, built by James Braby 1865 for the use of railway passengers was demolished and repaced by shops, noe the Co-op. Next door was the coalyard.
Entitled ‘Station Approach’, now Martlet Corner;  the old Martlet Hotel, built by James Braby 1865 for the use of railway passengers was demolished and replaced by shops, now the Co-op & Post Office.
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Gaskyns was built on the site of Gaskins Farm in 1892. The Barker family held village events such as this Empire Day ‘Masque of Empire’ in 1909. From 1930 owned by David Jamilly, film pioneer. Since 1948, the house and grounds have been home to Pennthorpe School
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The past, present and future of Rudgwick

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